The Lottery by Shirley Jackson

The lottery is a popular form of gambling in which participants purchase tickets for a chance to win a prize. Prizes may be cash or goods. In the United States, lotteries are operated by state governments, which hold a legal monopoly and use proceeds from ticket sales to fund government programs. In addition to state-run lotteries, privately operated lotteries and charity lotteries are also legal. Tickets are sold in a variety of outlets, including convenience stores, gas stations, restaurants and bars, service stations, bowling alleys, newsstands, and charitable organizations (e.g., churches and fraternal organizations).

A lottery is an activity in which numbers are drawn at random to determine the winner of a prize. The first recorded lotteries were held in the Low Countries in the 15th century, with the purpose of raising funds for town fortifications and to aid the poor. The oldest running lottery is the Dutch Staatsloterij, established in 1726.

In The Lottery, Shirley Jackson illustrates that traditions are powerful and often overpower the rational mind. People do things because they have always done them, and it is hard to convince others that the tradition is absurd. Old Man Warner is an example of a conservative force in the story. He tries to rationalize the lottery, but he is not successful.

Another theme that is shown in the story is that human nature is evil. It is portrayed by the way that the people treat each other. They greeted each other and exchanged bits of gossip, and they handled each other without the slightest flinch of pity.


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